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Number of items: 44.

Collection

Course design (Collection 2 of 7)

The activities in this collection provide opportunities for English lecturers (and others) to experiment and think creatively about the modules you currently teach or ones you may teach in the future. Some activities utilise videos of colleagues who have successfully designed whole programmes and individual modules. There are also worksheets and documents that you can download and modify.

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3 Files

Designing a creative-critical module

The activities in this resource are built around an audio-recording in which English lecturers Dr Chris Thurgar-Dawson (University of Teesside) and Professor Ben Knights (English Subject Centre) discuss a module they launched and taught on ‘creative criticism.’ The activities provide examples and contexts for re-thinking and designing new modules by experimenting with varying emphases on 'creative' and 'critical' content and teaching methods. Even if you do not adopt the ideas presented, they might stimulate you to think about module planning from a different angle.

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4 Files

Mapping and applying desirable student attributes

These activities are for English lecturers interested in developing their pedagogical skills in accord with the skills they would like their students to acquire. Both the individual and group activity are focused on the use of a stimulating list of 'desirable student attributes' such as having the patience to read long novels. How exactly are you hoping to affect your students' behaviour when you teach them? Obviously, you want them to attend classes and submit assessments, but what of more interesting, subtle practices? What intellectual, organisational, aesthetic qualities would you like your teaching to encourage? The argument of the activities in this resource is that thinking about possible answers to these questions is an excellent first step towards a reconceptualisation of your role as a lecturer.

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11 Files

Adapting a module

There are three different types activities in this resource each of which are drawn from literature teaching but which are adaptable to other subjects. In one you are provided with a full module description and asked how it might need to be modified for particular teaching contexts, such as whether it is a final year ‘option’ course, or a compulsory first year course. In the next activity, ‘Pacing it out’ you are challenged to halve the number of texts studied on a module and adapt your teaching approach accordingly. The third type of activity addresses ‘Curriculum Framing’ and asks you to consider the pedagogical contexts for teaching particular texts.

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3 Files

Filling the gaps

The premise of the activities in this resource (appropriate for an individual or a group) is that the time that students spend between lectures, seminars and workshops is as important as the time they spend in class sessions because this is how and where students develop the critical ability to work independently. However, students, especially first-years, need to be taught these skills and these activities provide guidance on how you might go about that work with methods that that push beyond the well-worn phrase, ‘read the book and think about it.’

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7 Files

Designing an innovative English Literature module

The activities in this resource are focused around an interview with Dr Hannah Crawforth (King's College London) about her design and launch of an innovative English Literature module, 'Shakespeare's London'. The activities, which are appropriate for individuals or groups, encourage you to think about how you might re-design and run old modules in new ways or launch new modules which draw students in with new features. The activities cover how one might take advantage of the location of your university (e.g. the local landscape or historic sites); how one might develop students’ research skills, and how one might ask relevant reflective questions about an existing module with a view towards revising and improving it.

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7 Files

Designing an English degree programme

There are three types of activities, appropriate for English lecturers working in groups or as individuals, in this resource. Their topics are employability, transition from A level, and getting the ‘delicate balance’ right between literature, language and Creative Writing when designing an English programme for today’s students. These activities rely in part on an interview with Professor Marion Wynne-Davies (University of Surrey). As Head of Department, Wynne-Davies shares the ideas and strategies she followed to launch the Surrey English degree programme in 2008.

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1 Files

Course design: introduction to the collection

The activities in this collection provide opportunities for English lecturers (and others) to experiment and think creatively about the modules you currently teach or ones you may teach in the future. Some activities utilise videos of colleagues who have successfully designed whole programmes and individual modules. There are also worksheets and documents that you can download and modify.

> Read more...

4 Files

Students, comments, conditions

Two exercises designed for English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. Both activities, one for groups, the other for individual lecturers, investigate the relationship between student condition (such as disabilities) and student comments about teaching. There is also an overview of the activities.

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Collection

Inclusive teaching (Collection 6 of 7)

This Collection is the sixth of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This collection of activities for individuals and groups highlights the importance of teaching inclusively in English Studies. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

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4 Files

Inclusive seminars

Two exercises on inclusive seminar design, for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. One activity is for use by an individual lecturer working alone; the other is for use in a group setting. Both activities involve the viewing of video examples of English Literature seminar leaders in action. There is also an overview of the activities.

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4 Files

Inclusive lectures

Two exercises on inclusive lecture design, for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. One activity is for use by an individual lecturer working alone; the other is for use in a group setting. Both activities involve the viewing of video examples of English Literature lecturers in action.

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5 Files

Imaginary students

Two exercises designed for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. The activities encourage lecturers to think of students as individuals rather than as types. One activity is for use by an individual lecturing working alone; the other is for use in a group setting. There is also an overview of the activities.

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1 Files

Inclusive teaching: introduction to the collection

This Collection is the sixth of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This collection of activities for individuals and groups highlights the importance of teaching inclusively in English Studies. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

> Read more...

Collection

Assessment (Collection 3 of 7)

This Collection is the third of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This resource collection aims to provoke thought about the role of assessment and feedback in undergraduate English programmes. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

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3 Files

What is assessment for?

This activity confronts English lecturers with the variety of concerns different interest groups have about assessment in their discipline, inviting them to be self-reflexive about their approach to assessment. It consists of three parts: 1. An overview of the activity; 2. An activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers; 3.An activity that can be done with a group (useful to leaders of accredited courses).

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6 Files

Feedback and marking strategies

This activity invites English lecturers to mark sample student work and use the process as a springboard for considering approaches to marking more generally. It consists of three parts: 1. An overview of the activity; 2. An activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers; 3.An activity that can be done with a group (useful to leaders of accredited courses).

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2 Files

Creative assessment

This activity invites English lecturers to think outside the box of conventional assessment methods and develop new, creative methods. It consists of an overview of the activity and an activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers.

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4 Files

Assessment SWOT analysis

This activity encourages English lecturers to focus on the strengths and weaknesses of various forms of assessment common on English programmes. It consists of three parts: 1. An overview of the activity; 2. An activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers; 3.An activity that can be done with a group (useful to leaders of accredited courses).

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3 Files

Designing and running innovative assessments

This activity is designed to help English lecturers think about the relationship between creative forms of assessment, learning outcomes and marking criteria. It consists of three parts: 1. An overview of the activity; 2. An activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers; 3.An activity that can be done with a group (useful to leaders of accredited courses).

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4 Files

Assessment audit

This activity enables English lecturers to 'audit' the assessment regime they use in their modules.. It consists of three parts: 1. An overview of the activity; 2. An activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers; 3.An activity that can be done with a group (useful to leaders of accredited courses).

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1 Files

Assessment: introduction to the collection

This Collection is the third of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This collection of activities for individuals and groups aims to provoke thought about the role of assessment and feedback in undergraduate English programmes. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

> Read more...

3 Files

The design of online activities in English Studies

This resource explores how we structure online learning activities and the way we present them for our students. It contains two activities that involve exploring a range of interactive online activities from English Literature courses. Participants should also gain a wider appreciation of the means by which online activities can be delivered (structure, presentation etc).

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3 Files

What are VLEs good for?

This resource introduces some of the key concepts, tools and benefits of using e-learning in the teaching of English Studies and provides a useful starting point for introducing colleagues to the benefits of using a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The resource is made up of two activities one for use with groups and one for individuals.

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1 Files

Online teaching: introduction to the collection

The object of this collection of resources is to both familiarise lecturers with the scope of online learning in English studies and to encourage thinking about the design, delivery and assessment of online learning.

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3 Files

Transformative writing

Two exercises on the use of creative writing in English Literature seminars. The exercises have been designed for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. One activity is for use by an individual lecturer working alone; the other is for use in a group setting. Both activities suggest ways of turning to pedagogic use an activity which students of the English subjects are expected to be able to perform, but which teachers all too often simply see as a medium of assessment. They propose and exemplify writing as a pedagogic tool. There is also an overview of the activities.

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3 Files

Nightmare scenarios

Two exercises designed for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. One activity is for use by an individual lecturer working alone; the other is for use in a group setting. The activities are designed to sustain novice lecturers and tutors in facing the things that most worry them about working with groups. The object is to achieve a base level of confidence which then bit by bit becomes self sustaining. The group activity involves the viewing of a video of English lecturers discussing potential solution to common seminar 'nightmare scenarios'. There is also an overview of the activities.

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3 Files

Thinking about seminars

Two exercises on planning and running seminars designed for use by individual English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. The activities invite lecturers to plan small group teaching on the basis that the seminar is not simply a vehicle of transmission, but an organism with a life of its own, operating simultaneously at social, intellectual, and emotional levels.

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3 Files

Peer reviewing a seminar: The Bonesetter's Daughter

Two exercises on seminar planning designed for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. Both activities can be used either by individual lecturers or in groups. They involve viewing a video of an English Literature seminar. The activities have been designed to create a suggestive space in which to think about the languages of seminars, and the forms of social, intellectual, and personal exchange that take place within them. There is also an overview of the activities.

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3 Files

Peer reviewing a seminar: Oliver Twist

Two exercises on seminar planning designed for use by individual English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. Both activities involve viewing a video of a seminar in English Literature. These activities offer lecturers the opportunity to apply and enrich their understanding of the seminar in a concrete way. By treating an example of a seminar as a text, they open up a number of questions about the dynamic of the seminar process. There is also an overview of the activities.

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3 Files

Seminar design

Two exercises on seminar planning designed for use by English lecturers seeking to develop their skills. One activity is for use by an individual lecturing working alone; the other is for use in a group setting. These activities are designed to stimulate thought about the forms and processes of small group teaching, suggesting ways in which a lecturer or tutor might move mentally between preparing their curriculum or content knowledge and their developing insight into how people learn in groups. There is also an overview of the activities.

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Collection

Small group teaching (Collection 4 of 7)

This Collection is the fourth of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This collection of activities for individuals and groups aims to help lecturers come to terms with some of the challenges of designing and running seminars. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

> Read more...

1 Files

Small group teaching: introduction to the collection

This Collection is the fourth of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This collection of activities for individuals and groups aims to help lecturers come to terms with some of the challenges of designing and running seminars. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

> Read more...

4 Files

Peer reviewing lectures

There are three activities in this resource, and they have been created around actual lectures delivered by staff at Royal Holloway, University of London, King’s College London and the University of Nottingham. Each lecture demonstrates different approaches to lecturing. The peer review activities are designed to prompt individuals or groups to begin thinking critically about what makes a good lecture/lecturer and what tools and tasks can help make a particular lecture more or less successful.

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3 Files

Planning and evaluating your lecture

There are two activities in this collection and both encourage you to be able to make a conscious shift between content (what you want to get across) and the dramatic and affective form through which you are going to have to perform it. The activities are appropriate for individuals or groups and comprise peer review work as well as an opportunity to think of the lecture as a genre. One activity utilises video footage of Dr Hannah Crawforth (King’s College London), who discusses lectures as a form of rhetoric. The other activity asks that you attend a colleague’s lecture, record yourself giving a lecture, or use a video of someone else’s lecture as a starting point.

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4 Files

Identifying good and bad practice

The activities in this resource, like the peer review activities elsewhere in this collection, are designed to prompt individuals or groups to begin thinking critically about what makes a good lecture/lecturer. Included are a mock ‘bad’ lecture to evaluate and an exercise in self-reflection on your own methods of delivering a lecture—are you more comfortable using an improvisational technique or do you write your lectures out word for word?

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1 Files

Large group teaching: introduction to the collection

This collection of resources for English lecturers (and others) provides platforms and exercises through which to refine your ideas about what a lecture should and can do pedagogically. Included are examples of actual lectures, guidance on how to evaluate and reflect upon your own and other people's lectures, a mock ‘bad’ lecture and suggestions for how to stretch the limits of large-group teaching structures.

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Collection

Large group teaching (Collection 5 of 7)

This collection of resources for English lecturers (and others) provides platforms and exercises through which to refine your ideas about what a lecture should and can do pedagogically. Included are examples of actual lectures, guidance on how to evaluate and reflect upon your own and other people's lectures, a mock ‘bad’ lecture and suggestions for how to stretch the limits of large-group teaching structures.

> Read more...

2 Files

Hearing yourself teach

This resource is a development of the familiar idea of a learning journal. It represents an invitation to use private writing as a medium for extending and reflecting upon teaching experience. Thus it focuses on the use of reflective dialogue to defamiliarise day-to-day experience, and consciously improve teaching practice. The resource consists of an introduction and an activity for individuals to undertake in their own time.

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3 Files

Writing & the teacher

This resource contains a set of activities that use 'Imaginative writing' in various ways as a tool for thinking and learning. Like many of the resources in The Pool, it aims to breach the barriers between subject thinking and educational thinking. The resource is made up of an introduction and two different activities: Activity 1: helps teachers and supporters of learning to explore the way in which their values and experience inform their minute-to-minute pedagogic decisions. Activity 2: involves identifying metaphors for teaching and then exploring them in practical ways.

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3 Files

Working with the Creative Writing subject benchmark statement

This resource is designed to introduce lecturers to the Creative Writing Benchmark Statement, and to help them gain a deeper understanding of how the Benchmark works and how it can be applied in practice. It invites individuals or a group to explore for themselves the significance and value of this kind of document. This resource consists of three parts. 1. An overview of the activity 2. Using the Creative Writing Benchmark: an Individual Activity 3. Using the Creative Writing Benchmark: a Group activity.

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3 Files

Working with the English subject benchmark statement

This activity is designed to familiarise early career lecturers with the English Benchmark Statement, and the principles underlying such documents. It consists of three parts: 1. An overview of the activity; 2. An activity that can be done with a group (useful to leaders of accredited courses); 3. An activity that can be carried out by individual lecturers.

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Collection

The Subject & Pedagogy (Collection 1 of 7)

This Collection is the first of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This resource collection (like all those which together form 'The Pool') is designed to inspire thinking about the formative relations between educational practice and the scholarly study of language, writing, and culture. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

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1 Files

The Subject & pedagogy: introduction to the collection

This Collection is the first of seven that make up 'The Pool', a selection of Open Educational Resources designed to support the professional development of English lecturers. This resource collection (like all those which together form 'The Pool') is designed to inspire thinking about the formative relations between educational practice and the scholarly study of language, writing, and culture. Of interest to lecturers at different career stages (especially those just setting out), and to leaders of accredited courses.

> Read more...

This list was generated on Sun Sep 3 13:57:06 2017 BST.